Preliminary Program

                 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND MATHEMATICS
                         January 3-5, 1996,
               Marina Marriott, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

                            General Chair:
            Martin Golumbic, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan

                          Program co-chairs:
                     Henry Kautz and Bart Selman
                          AT&T Bell Labs

		      Local Arrangements Chair:
            Frederick Hoffman, Florida Atlantic University

                            Program at a glance
                            ===================
Wedn., Jan. 3
 9:00--10:15 OPENING ADDRESS: DNA Computing, Richard Lipton
10:15--10:45 break
10:45--12:00 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
12:00-- 1:30 lunch
 1:30-- 2:45 INVITED TALK: A Unified Semantics for Probability and Logic, Glenn Shafer
 2:45-- 3:00 break
 3:00-- 4:15 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
 4:15-- 4:30 break
 4:30-- 6:00 TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Thurs., Jan. 4
 9:00--10:15 INVITED TALK: Constraint Programming, Jean-Louis Lassez
10:15--10:45 break
10:45--12:00 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
10:15--10:45 break
12:00-- 1:30 lunch
 1:30-- 2:45 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
 2:45-- 3:15 break
 3:15-- 4:30 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
 4:30-- 4:45 break
 4:45-- 6:00 PANEL - Knowledge Compilation and Approximation
 7:00--10:00 banquet / banquet speech: Lessons from Computer Chess, Monte Newborn

Fri., Jan. 5
 9:00--10:15 INVITED TALK: Deduction with Constraints in Rewriting Logic, Kirchner 
10:15--10:45 break
10:45--12:00 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
12:00-- 1:30 lunch
 1:30-- 2:45 TECHNICAL SESSIONS
 2:45-- 3:15 break
 3:15-- 4:30 TUTORIAL: Logical Analysis of Data, Peter Hammer


                                   Technical Sessions
                                   ==================
Wedn. morning
..................
COMPLEXITY / ALGORITHMS
   A formal framework for evaluating heuristic programs
         Lenore Cowen, Joan Feigenbaum, and Sampath Kannan
   Graph parameters for time-space tradeoff
         Rina  Dechter
   Anytime families of tractable propositional reasoners
         Mukesh Dalal
LEARNING / DISCOVERY
   Computing optimal shallow decision trees
         David Dobkin, Dimitrios Gunopulos, and Simon Kasif
   PAC-learning from general examples
         Paul Fischer, Klaus-Uwe Hoffgen, and Hanno Lefmann
   Algorithms for PAC learning of functions with smoothness properties
         Naheswara S.V. Rao and V. Protopopescu
THEOREM PROVING
   Heuristics for a semantic tree theorem prover
         Qingxun Yu, Mohammed Almulla, and Monroe Newborn
   Inductive theorem proving via abstraction
         Adolfo Villafiorita and Fausto Giunchiglia
   The adaption of proof methods by reformulation
          Xiaorong Huang, Manfred Kerber, and Lassaad Ceikhrouhou

Wedn. afternoon
....................
LEARNING / DISCOVERY / PROBABILITY
   Axioms of causal relevance
         David Galles and Judea Pearl
   On the complexity of learning decision trees
          J. Kent Martin and D. S. Hirschberg
   Scientific discovery based on belief revision
         Eric Martin and Daniel Osherson
COMPLEXITY / ALGORITHMS
   An efficient algorithm for unit propagation
         Hantao Zhang and Mark E. Stickel
   Abstraction and the CSP phase transition boundary
         Robert Schrag and Danile Miranker
   The very particular structure of the very hard instances
         Dan Vlasie
SYSTEMS
   Representing systems of interacting components in EUCLID
         K. J. Dryllerakis and M. J. Sergot
   Progenes: using metaknowledge to solve scientific problems
         P. Castells, R. Moriyon, and F. Saiz
   Blending AI and mathematics: the case of resource allocation
         Berthe Choueiry, Guevara Noubir, and Boi Faltings

Wedn. 4:30
...................
ABSTRACTION AND REFORMULATION
   Fausto Giunchiglia, Thomas Ellman, Pandurang Nayak,
   Christer Backstrom, Mike Lowry, Henry Kautz, and Alon Levy

NONMON / LOGIC PROGRM.
   Mixing a default rule with stable negation
	  Jack Minker and Carolina Ruiz
   Representability by default theories
         Wiktor Marek, Jan Treur, and Miroslaw Truszczynski
   Classical negaton in non-monotonic reasoning and logic programming
         Jose Alferes, Luis Moniz Pereira, and Teodor Przymusinski

Thurs. morning
......................
PLANNING 
   Tractable plan existence does not imply tractable plan generation
          Peter Jonsson and Christer Backstrom
   A re-examination of the modal truth criteria for non-linear planning
          Maria Fox and Derek Long
   Simple recurrent neural networks as probability models
          Mostefa Golea, Masahiro Matsuoka, and Yasubumi Sakakibara
AI&OR / OPTIMIZATION
   Using computational learning strategies as a tool for comb. optim.
         Andreas Birkendorf and Hans Ulrich Simon
   Towards a closer integration of finite domain prop. and simplex-based alg.
         M.T. Hajian, H. El-Sakkout, M. Wallace, J.M. Lever, and E. B. Richards 
   Formalizing commonsense topology: the INCH calculusO
         Nicholas Mark Gotts 
PERCEPTION
   Introducing the mathematical category of artificial perceptions
          Zippora Arzi-Gonczarowski and Daniel Lehmann
   Sensor planning in 3D object search: its formulation and complexity
         Yiming Ye and John Tsotsos

Thurs., 1:30
......................
COMPLEXITY / ALGORITHMS
   Verification of prop. formulae by means of convex and concave transforms
         Hans van Maaren, Jan Friso Groote and Michiel Rozema
   Categorical decompositions, graph searching and problem solving
         Robert Zimmer and Robert Holte
   On the model checking complexity of circumscription
         Alexei P. Lisitsa
MATHEMATICAL ADVANCES IN PROBABILISTIC REASONING
   Markov properties of cyclic graphs
         Jan Koster
   Probability Trees and their Generalizations
         Glenn Shafer
   Conditional Independence Structures Examined via Minors
         Frantisek Matus
UNCERTAINTY
   Bayesian knowledge incorporation
          Irina Tchoumatchenko and Jean-Gabriel Ganascia
   Fuzzy modal logic
          Andrew Mironov
   Uncertainty reasoning using Gaussian belief functions
          Liping Liu

Thurs., 3:15
......................
THEOREM PROVING
   Detecting logical inconsistencies
         Bertrand Mazure, Lakhdar Sais, and Eric Gregoire    
   Focusing ATMS problem-solving: a formal approach
         Gregory Provan
   Diagrams and mathematics
         Dave Barker-Plummer, Sidney Bailin, and Samuel Ehrlichman
NONMONOTONIC AND META-REASONING
   Minimal number of perm. to compute all ext. for a finite default theory
          Pawel Cholewinski and Miroslaw Truszczynski
   Non-monotonic reasoning: from complexity to algorithms
         C. Cayrol,  M.C. Lagasquie-Schiex, and Thomas Schiex
   Automating the synthesis of decision proc. in a constructive metatheory
         Alessandro Armando, Jason Gallagher and Alan Smaill

Fri. morning
......................
AI AND OR 
   A Fast Algorithm for Determining Falsifiability of Implication Formulas
          John Franco
   Distance-Based Classification Methods
          Alexander Kogan
   Learning of Boolean Functions under a Monotonicity Assumption
          Evagelos Triantaphyllou
   Structure and Representation of Horn Rule Bases
          Endre Boros
MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES
   Topological modal logic for subset frames with finite descent
         Bernhard Heinemann 
   The structure of interlaced bilattices
          Aron Avron

Fri. afternoon
......................
KR FORMALISMS
   Horn Rules and Description Logics: Can they be combined?
          Alon Levy and Marie-Christine Rousset
   From knowing how to knowing that
          Gilbert Ndjatou
SATISFIABILITY
   Davis-Putnam-Loveland versus ``Resolution Search''
          Vasek Chvatal
   Analysis of the Space of Solutions for Random Instances of the 
          Satisfiability Problem, Olivier Dubois
   Solving Problems with Hard and Soft Constraints: Using a Stochastic 
          Algorithm for MAX-SAT, Bart Selman
   Satisfiability from a different point of view
          Ewald Speckenmeyer


                     Registration and Travel Info
                     ============================
				   
		     HOTEL AND TRAVEL INFORMATION
				   
Rooms have been blocked at the Fort Lauderdale Marina Marriott that
are available to the participants at a rate of $95 per night, single
or double occupancy for the Symposium, a huge savings against the
''rack rate.''  They must be booked directly with the hotel by
December 19:
				   
		   Fort Lauderdale Marina Marriott,
	1881 Southeast 17th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316.
			Phone: (305) 463-4000
                        Fax:   (305) 527-6705

The applicants must mention the symposium, and should probably mention
Florida Atlantic University. The hotel management would like the
applicants to specify arrival and departure dates and estimated time
of arrival, room preference (single or double/double, smoking or
non-smoking), credit card type to be used for payment including number
and expiration date (this, or a one-night deposit, is absolutely
necessary to hold rooms past 6PM).
				   
Delta Air Lines, Inc., in cooperation with the Fourth International
Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Mathematics, is offering
special rates to the meeting. These fares are based on Delta's
published round-trip fares within the United States and Canada, San
Juan, Nassau, Bermuda, St. Thomas, and St. Croix. To take advantage of
these discounts, call your travel agent or call Delta at
1-800-241-6760, for reservations 7:30 a.m.-11:00 p.m., Mon-Fri, 8:30
a.m.-11:00 p.m., Sat/Sun Eastern time, and refer to file number
XM0039.
				   
		  SYMPOSIUM REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Regular Advanced Registration Fee: $165
Student Advanced Registration Fee: $85
Student Advanced Registration Fee, excluding banquet: $50

Regular On-site Registration Fee: $195
Student On-site Registration Fee: $105

Fee includes banquet (except for the special $50 student rate) 
and reception. Additional banquet tickets are $35.
Advanced registrations must be received by December 22,
1995.  Refunds will be made--less a $15 processing fee--for
cancellations made in 1995.  If you have full-time professional
employment, you are not entitled to the student rate.

To register, provide the following information:
___________________________________________________________________
Name:

Affiliation:

Mailing Address:

Phone:

Email:

__ Regular $165
__ Extra banquet ticket $35
__ Student $85
__ Student, no banquet $50
     If student, specify student status:

Payment made by
__ Mastercard, card number:_________________ expires:_____
__ Visa, card number:_________________ expires:_____
__ Check (enclosed) payable to the FAU Foundation, account S078,
      in US dollars.
___________________________________________________________________

** Postal Address for registration **
        International Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Mathematics
	Mathematics Department
	Florida Atlantic University
	Boca Raton, FL 33431  USA

** FAX address for registration **
	(407) 367-2436
	attn: Frederick Hoffman

** Email address for registration **
	aim4@acc.fau.edu

** Telephone registration **
	Contact Mary Anne Bytheway, at (407) 367-3010;
	specify the Math Conference account, S078.
				   
     DIRECT ALL QUESTIONS CONCERNING REGISTRATION AND TRAVEL TO:
   Frederick Hoffman, hoffman@acc.fau.edu or hoffman@fauvax.bitnet
				   
			 SYMPOSIUM HOME PAGE
http://www.research.att.com/orgs/ssr/people/kautz/aimath96/aimath96.html
				   
	  DIRECT QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE PROGRAM (ONLY) TO:
		 Henry Kautz, kautz@research.att.com
		 Bart Selman, selman@research.att.com

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